Ben Simmons Is Very Interesting

His handle is so good he’s neither right-handed nor left-handed.

He was the pre-season player of the year, a pre-season first team All-American, and the projected number one pick in the 2016 NBA draft without having stepped on a college court, and he’s exceeded expectations.

He doesn’t dribble. He glides. He’s Fred Astaire in sneakers.

His passes are so accurate they come stamped with a return receipt.

Magic compares himself to him.

He leads his team in points, rebounds, shooting percentage, assists, steals, and blocked shots.

He was born and raised in Australia, where his Bronx-born dad played professional basketball and married an Australian woman with four kids. Playing for Montverde Academy in Florida beginning with his sophomore year, he led his team to three consecutive high school national championships and won the Morgan Wootten Award as the McDonald’s All-American who best exemplifies outstanding character, leadership, and academics.

At 6’10″, 245 lbs, with the wing span of a pterodactyl, the hops of a kangaroo, and superior ball-handling skills, he can take it to the hoop at any time.

“One of the best ever to play,” said Antawn Jamison of the 19 year old.

He rarely shoots the three ball… He doesn’t have to.

In fact, he doesn’t shoot very much at all – but when he does, it’s with near 60% accuracy and more than a dash of the spectacular.

He’s Ben Simmons of LSU, the most interesting basketball player in the world.

Outside of the recruiting trail, where he is legend, Simmons may also be one of the more well kept secrets in the world. Ben’s identity, let alone his excellence, is far from common knowledge among the sports fan public, which continues to be mesmerized with pro football. The NFL trumps interest in college basketball until after the Super Bowl. And that’s not about to change.

Despite a series of public relations disasters which would have crippled a mid-size country, the NFL is more popular than ever, and has expanded its reach by partnering with fantasy gambling sites Fan Duel and Draft Kings. Early this season, the sites advertised shamelessly during NFL games. When New York State’s attorney general instituted a court case to shut down Fan Duel and Draft Kings in New York, they wisely curbed back on the obnoxious advertising; but the league succeeded in introducing millions to legal gambling on football.

The mix of fantasy site gambling with the NFL’s intoxicating game action has produced an excitement package strong enough to withstand the fall-out from the bad stuff, which, if you’re counting, includes a) rampant player misconduct; b) Deflategate; c) the spate of concussion lawsuits; d) steroid allegations; e) inconsistent rule interpretations which cloud our understanding of catches, fumbles, and touchdowns; f) too many penalties; g) the Redskin logo uproar; and h) the latest slap in the face, the Rams’ relocation from St.Louis to LA, which was characterized by Michael Powell of the New York Times as “a move consistent with the league’s tear-’em-up, toss-’em-out ethos.”

Two years of uninterrupted bad acts by the league and its players should have undermined the public’s confidence in the game. But revenues and ratings and fan interest have suffered not a lick from the league’s blunders and bad press. Deflategate?… Who cares? Peyton Manning on steroids? … The purveyor of the story, Al Jazeera, left town. A playoff run quickly extinguished the Redskins logo issue. Nothing stands in the way of the NFL. It’s bigger than US Steel.

Ben Simmons Finishes

But if ever there was a college basketball game, and a player, to break through the NFL haze prior to the Super Bowl, the game was the 3-overtime thriller between no.1 Kansas and no.2 Oklahoma on January 4th; and the player is Simmons, who has displayed his full portfolio of skills in leading the Bayou Bengals to a 3-1 start in the SEC, including last week’s decisive triumph over Kentucky and a home win over tough Ole Miss last night.

Kansas-Oklahoma had a lot of hype going in. Not only was it the first regular season meeting between a No 1 and No 2 team in the same conference since 2007 (Ohio St-Michigan), but the teams were reversed in the two major polls. The AP voted Kansas No. 1, Oklahoma No. 2; the Coaches Poll placed Oklahoma in the top rung and Kansas second. The conflict was understandable. The game could not have been more even.

After both teams had blown opportunities to win in regulation and both overtimes, Kansas survived 109-106. “We beat a team that could win a national championship,” Kansas coach Bill Self said. Oklahoma nearly did the same thing.

LSU is not in that category. After a weak non-conference performance, including three straight losses to lesser foes, the Tigers probably need to go 12-6 in the SEC to assure an NCAA berth. If not, then Simmons will probably lose out on player of the year honors to Buddy Hield of Oklahoma, Melo Trimble of Maryland, or Denzel Valentine of Michigan State, who play for top teams. Nor is Simmons a finished product. In a recent loss at Florida, he had seven turnovers in the second half, three of them on offensive fouls. Sometimes he tries to do too much, as when he passes up the mid-range jumper for a more difficult shot or pass.

As he gets used to what his teammates can and cannot do, and develops confidence in his jump shot, Simmons will iron out the few wrinkles in his game. His signature move leaves no room for improvement.

When Simmons rips the ball off the defensive board, and turns up court with a full head of steam, culminating with a dish to a trailing teammate for an easy lay-up or his own thunderous dunk, he indelibly brands himself as a once-in-a-generation player.

And that’s pretty interesting.


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